Painted Teapot

Hi Everyone!  It’s been a while since I’ve posted a tutorial, so get ready, this one’s a doozy!

With Spring just around the corner I decided to make something with a fresh and springy feel.  While perusing the Christmas Tree Shop last weekend I found a pretty simple off white teapot, boring on it’s own, but it was less than $8 and I knew I could spruce it up!

  Off I went to Michaels (my local craft store) in search of some paint that would work.  I found Porcelaine, which is great on porcelain or ceramic.  I picked it up in a couple fun spring colors (Saffron Orange, Fuchsia, Turquoise, and White), and grabbed a pack of 2 applicator bottles:

 The applicator bottles are great and easy to use.  You just pour in your paint and screw on the top.  You can then either attach the saver top (which keeps your paint safe from drying out) or you can add the metal tip for painting.  It also comes with a little pin to stick in the metal top while you aren’t using it, to prevent it from getting clogged with dry paint.  Lovely!  And the best part about the paint is that it cleans up with warm soap and water.  My kinda project!

I was now in business!  The first thing I did was grab some left over .16 cent  tiles from my coaster project to practice on.  I tried a couple different ideas to see what looked good, and to also get a sense of what my applicator bottle felt like.  I highly suggest taking this extra time.  It was a waste of tile, but they were inexpensive and I wanted to get the feel of painting on porcelain rather than just practicing on paper:

 I wasn’t overly thrilled with what I was coming up with, but was feeling pretty comfortable with the applicator bottle, so I went online in search of a fairly simple Paisley Pattern.  I found this and printed it out:

I grabbed an old cereal box, flattened it out, and traced/cut out one of the large and one of the small paisleys.  I now had my template to work with!

I grabbed some good old scotch tape, attached a small piece to the back of my template, and attached it to the tile.  I then traced around the template with my applicator bottle using small dots of paint.  Unfortunately pencil doesn’t really stick to tile, otherwise you could trace your template first, and then go over it with paint.  Here is the process:

 I arranged my two sizes in different positions around the tile.  If I wanted it to face the other direction, I simple flipped over the cardboard and taped it upside down on the tile.  How easy was that?:

After a couple of different colored layers, I was pretty happy with where things were going.  I used the Turquoise straight out of the bottle, but added a little white to the Orange to make a spring yellow.

Now I was ready to give the teapot a go.  I followed the same steps, tape the template onto the teapot, trace around with small dots of paint, remove, and reapply.  I was careful to let the paint dry a little before removing my template because I didn’t want anything to smudge.  Here is how it started coming together:

 Because I only had 2 applicator bottles I was only able to do 2 colors at a time.  But it is important to let your paint dry a bit if you are putting colors near each other, otherwise they may bleed a bit.  Here is another shot of what the applicator bottles look like, and how my teapot started to progress:

 After the original trace around the template, I free handed the rest.  Not hard to do when you’re just staying inside a shape.  Once I was happy with my current layers, I washed out the Turquoise and added Fuchsia to my applicator bottle.  I also added a fair amount of white to this to make a nice spring pink.  I decided to make dots that tapered towards the point of my paisley.  This is really easy to do…the larger you want your dot, the harder you squeeze the bottle.  The smaller you want the dot, the lighter you squeeze the bottle.  Easy peasy:

I then filled in the rest of my pattern with yellow, took a step back and admired my hard work.  I played around with the tiles that I had made, as practice, and decided that I like the paisley by itself without any extra embellishments:

 Here is my finished teapot with the paint drying:

 The final step is to “fire” the pot in the oven.  This sets the paint and makes it dishwasher safe.  Crazy, huh?  Follow the directions on the back of the paint, mine said 35 minutes at a 300 degree oven.  Easy enough!  I love how this turned out, I think for now I’m going to leave the handle, spout, and lid plain white, but I might add a pattern to them as well.  Here she is all finished and sitting in the sun:

While I was out the other day I found these puppies:

You bet you’re booty they will be painted to match!  Along with a full set of coasters, at least that’s my plan for now!  We’ll see what the next few weeks actually allow me time for…

Happy almost spring everyone!

Photobucket

Simply Living